040114 js 1535SPRINGFIELD – Video cameras and motion sensors could be added to a list of illegal booby traps under a proposed law approved by the Illinois Senate on Tuesday.

Senator Bill Haine (D-Alton) sponsored plan, House Bill 4269, in the Senate to update the existing law that targets drug dealers who fortify buildings against law enforcement.

“If drug dealers have cameras or motion sensors to let them know when the police are coming, it gives them a chance to escape or destroy evidence,” Haine said.

It is currently illegal to booby trap a building in order to obstruct police. The list of criminal fortifications includes alarm systems, cross bars, steel doors, and the use of dogs.

Representative Jerry Costello (D-Smithton) introduced the plan in the House.

“Law Enforcement officers already take great risk entering a location of suspected criminal activity, and any attempt to harm or impede them in the course of their duties should be aggressively punished,” Costello said.

The Senate approved HB 4269 by a 57-0 vote. It was approved by the House in April and now goes to the governor for approval.

Category: News Releases

051914 js 0190SPRINGFIELD – Meth cooks who set up labs close to schools could face higher penalties under a plan approved by the Illinois State Senate on Tuesday.

Senator Bill Haine (D-Alton) sponsored the legislation in the Senate that expands aggravated participation in methamphetamine manufacturing to people who cook the dangerous drug within 1,000 feet of school property. Representative Dan Beiser (D-Alton) introduced the plan in the House.

“Exposing young people to this terrible drug or to the dangers associated with meth making is a crime that needs greater penalties,” Haine said.

“I appreciate the South Roxana Police Department bringing to my attention a way the existing law can be strengthened to protect our communities,” Beiser said.

The offense – aggravated participation in methamphetamine manufacturing – already applies to people who manufacture meth in the presence of minors, seniors or pregnant women. It also applies to cases where the meth lab explodes, it injures others, it takes place in an apartment building or the person making the meth takes steps to fortify or booby trap the production site.

Depending on the amount of meth being manufactured, penalties could range from 6-60 years in prison or a fine based on the street value of the drugs.

The plan, House Bill 4093, passed the Senate by a 57-0 vote. It passed the House in April and now moves to the governor for approval.

Category: News Releases

051914 js 0055SPRINGFIELD – Illinois State Senator Bill Haine (D-Alton) sponsored two bills that passed the Senate on Monday aimed at protecting adults with disabilities, children and individuals with severe intellectual disabilities.

 

 

 

Adult protective services update

The Illinois Senate approved follow-up legislation Monday to a 2013 reform package that overhauled protections for adults with disabilities.

The plan – sponsored Haine – protects the Illinois Department on Aging from being sued for enforcing the Adult Protective Services Act.

“This is follow through. We passed these safeguards last year, and we’re continuing to fine-tune protections for this at-risk population,” Haine said.

Last year’s legislation was triggered by a series of Belleville News Democrat stories reporting the failure of state agencies to protect against abuses of disabled adults.

One feature of the Adult Protective Services Act was an online registry of healthcare workers who have previously abused, neglected or financial explicated disabled adults under their care.

These workers are banned from being caregivers employed by the state or by organizations regulated by the state.

Haine’s proposal shields the Department and its employees from legal liability for posting healthcare workers information to the registry.

The plan, House Bill 4327, passed the Senate by a 50-0 vote. It now returns to the House for a concurrence vote.

New penalties for severe child, disabled abuse

Police in Illinois would be free to seize property of adults who severely abuse children younger than 13 years old under a plan approved by the State Senate on Monday.

Haine’s proposal gives police the authority to seize cars, boats or aircraft in cases where the owner causes bodily harm or disability or disfigurement to child or person with severe intellectual disabilities.

“Police and sheriff departments can already seize property for severe offenses. This plan extends it to some of the most deplorable types of crime,” Haine said.

The plan, House Bill 5523, passed the Senate by a 50-0 vote. It now returns to the House for a concurrence vote.

Category: News Releases

041014 js 1207SPRINGFIELD – Professionals in Illinois who break the rules of their licenses could face steeper penalties. The Illinois Senate approved a plan giving regulators more flexibility when disciplining severe breaches of professional conduct.

Senator Bill Haine (D-Alton) sponsored the plan following a court case where a doctor was only given a 6-month suspension after having sex with and giving alcohol and marijuana to a 20 year-old patient.

“This will lead to appropriate discipline for egregious actions. Professionals in Illinois are held to a high standard. If you break the rules and the public trust you should face the consequences,” Haine said.

In the court case, Kafin v. IDFPR, the court overturned an Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation attempt to strip the doctor’s license. The plan passed by the Senate strengthens the department’s ability to enforce its existing rules.

The department handles professional certification and licensing. It regulates jobs ranging from locksmiths to barbers and doctors to pawnshop managers.

The plan, Senate Bill 232, passed the Senate by a 57-0 vote on Thursday, and it now moves to the House for approval.

Category: News Releases

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